About Us ServicesSpecialsTestimonialsPhoto GalleryContact Us
Raking and dethatching should be your first task of spring lawn care. Raking is for more than just removing leaves: it's for controlling thatch, too. A thatch build-up of more than 1/2 inch is considered excessive.
Fertilization. Spring is a crucial time to fertilize because it replenishes the food reserves your yard draws from while dormant in the winter and fuels grass' rapid growth phase.
Apply a pre-emergent weed killer on lawns to prevent grassy weeds from germinating. Spring broadleaf weeds like dandelions, clovers and plantains, are best prevented by maintaining a proper mowing height and fertilization. After a mild winter, annual weeds that germinate in the fall, like henbit and chickweed, will be more visible and require higher levels of broadleaf weed control through herbicides.
Adding mulch to your garden will improve the health of the soil and beautify the appearance of your landscaping. Cover garden beds with a layer of mulch to keep weeds down and reduce the need for water. Annual weed seeds are less likely to sprout when the soil is covered with enough mulch to keep the soil surface in the dark. When it comes to water, even a thin layer of mulch (nature's moisturizer) will reduce evaporation from the soil surface. Thicker mulches can reduce water use by as much as 50 percent.
Contact us for a free estimate!